How to Get EU Settled status in the Uk

How to Stay in the UK after it leaves the EU: A step by step Guide

Overview


If you are a EU citizen, you and your family will be able to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme to continue living in the UK after 30 June 2021. If your application is successful, you’ll get either settled or pre-settled status. You may be able to stay in the UK without applying, for example, if you’re an Irish citizen or have indefinite leave to remain (ILR).


The UK has reached an agreement with Norway, Iceland, Liechtenstein, and a separate agreement with Switzerland.


When you can apply for EU Settled Status?


The EU Settlement Scheme will open fully by 30 March 2019. You may be able to apply now if you meet the criteria.


The deadline for applying will be 30 June 2021.
When you choose to apply may depend on your circumstances.
The deadline for applying will be 31 December 2020 if the UK leaves the EU without a deal .


Fees

New: The Prime Minster has now announced applying for EU Settled Status will be free from March 30th 2019.


The fee to apply is:
• £65 if you’re 16 or over • £32.50 if you’re under 16


It’ll be free to apply if:


• you already have indefinite leave to remain in or enter the UK

you have a valid ‘UK permanent residence document’

• you’re applying from April 2019 to move from pre-settled status to settled status •

you’re a child looked after by a local authority

Who should apply


If you’re an EU citizen or a family member of an EU citizen, you’ll usually need to apply if you want to stay in the UK after 30 June 2021.
This includes if you either:


• were born in the UK but are not a British citizen • are married to a British citizen and you’re from the EU


You’ll not usually be eligible to apply if you’re married to a British citizen and you’re from outside the EU.


The EU Settlement Scheme will open fully by 30 March 2019. You may be able to apply now if you meet the criteria.


Who does not need to apply
You do not need to apply if:
• you’re an Irish citizen – your family members from outside either the UK or Ireland will still need to apply • you have indefinite leave to enter the UK • you have indefinite leave to remain in the UK
You can apply if you already have indefinite leave to remain in or enter the UK , but you do not need to.
Your family members from outside either the UK or Ireland will still need to apply even if you do not need to.
Applying if you’re from outside the EU
You must be in a relationship with an EU citizen as their spouse, civil partner or unmarried partner.
You’ll need a residence card to prove your relationship if you’re unmarried.
You can also be related to an EU citizen, their spouse or civil partner as their:
• child, grandchild or great-grandchild under 21 years old • dependent child over the age of 21 • dependent parent, grandparent or great-grandparent • dependent relative with a residence card to prove your relationship
If you have a ‘UK permanent residence document’
You will still need to apply.
Read the guidance on what to do if you have a UK permanent residence document

Your rights and status


The rights and status of EU citizens living in the UK will remain the same until 30 June 2021. If you apply to the EU Settlement Scheme successfully, you’ll be able to continue living and working in the UK after 30 June 2021.


You’ll be given either:
• settled status • pre-settled status
You will not be asked to choose which you’re applying for.
Settled status


You’ll usually get settled status if you’ve:
• started living in the UK by 31 December 2020 • lived in the UK for a continuous 5-year period (‘continuous residence’)
Five years’ continuous residence means that for 5 years in a row you’ve been in the UK for at least 6 months in any 12 month period, except for:
• one period of up to 12 months for an important reason (for example, childbirth, serious illness, study, vocational training or an overseas work posting) • compulsory military service of any length


You will only need to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme once if you get settled status.


Your rights with settled status


If you have settled status you can stay in the UK as long as you like.
You can also:
• apply for British citizenship, if you’re eligible • work in the UK • use the NHS • enrol in education or continue studying • access public funds such as benefits and pensions, if you’re eligible for them • travel in and out of the UK
You can also bring close family members to the UK after 31 December 2020 if both of the following apply:
• your relationship with them began before 31 December 2020 • you are still in the relationship when they apply to join you
If your relationship with them began after 31 December 2020, your family member will be able to come here on a family visa.
Any children born in the UK while you’re living here will automatically be British citizens.
You should be able to spend up to 5 years in a row outside the UK without losing your settled status.
How long you can live outside the UK is still subject to approval by Parliament.


Pre-settled status
If you do not have 5 years’ continuous residence, you’ll usually get ‘pre-settled status’ instead.
You can stay in the UK for a further 5 years from the date you get pre-settled status, but you must apply again and get settled status if you want to stay here for longer than that.
Changing your pre-settled status to settled status
You can apply to change your status as soon as you’ve got 5 years’ continuous residence. If you apply after April 2019, it will be free.
Your rights with pre-settled status
You can spend up to 2 years in a row outside the UK without losing your pre-settled status, but you will need to maintain your continuous residence if you want to qualify for settled status.
You will be able to:
• work in the UK • use the NHS • enrol in education or continue studying • access public funds such as benefits and pensions, if you’re eligible for them • travel in and out of the UK
Any children born in the UK after you’ve got pre-settled status will be automatically eligible for presettled status. They will only be a British citizen if they qualify for it through their other parent.
Viewing and proving your status
If you successfully apply, the Home Office will email you a link to an online service that you can use to view and prove your status.
You will not get a physical document unless both of the following apply:
• you’re from outside the EU • you do not already have a biometric residence card
If you’re an EU citizen, you’ll still be able to use your passport or identity card to enter the UK once you get settled or pre-settled status.

If you have permanent residence or indefinite leave to remain
The process of applying to the EU Settlement Scheme is different if you have a permanent residence document or indefinite leave to remain.
If you have a valid ‘UK permanent residence document’
If you have a valid UK permanent residence document, you’ll have one of the following:
• a certificate inside your blue ‘residence documentation’ booklet (or pink if you’re a Swiss national) • a certificate inside your passport • a biometric residence card confirming permanent residence (only if you’re from outside the EU)
Your document is not a permanent residence document if it has ‘registration certificate’ written on it.


If you’re from the EU, EEA or Switzerland your permanent residence document will say ‘Document Certifying Permanent Residence’.
If you’re from outside the EU, EEA or Switzerland, your passport will say ‘Permanent Residence Status’.


You can change your permanent residence document to settled status by applying to the EU Settlement Scheme. You will not have to pay or prove you have 5 years’ continuous residence.


If you have indefinite leave to remain in or enter the UK
Indefinite leave to remain (ILR) is a type of immigration status you’ll usually have applied for. You’ll usually have a stamp in your passport or a letter from the Home Office. You could also have a ‘vignette’ (sticker) or a biometric residence permit.


You can continue to live in the UK without applying to the EU Settlement Scheme if you have indefinite leave to remain in or enter the UK. However, if you choose to apply (and meet all the other conditions), you’ll get ‘indefinite leave to remain under the EU Settlement Scheme’ – also known as settled status.


This means you should be able to spend up to 5 years in a row outside the UK without losing your settled status (instead of 2 years with the indefinite leave to remain or enter you have now).


How long you can live outside the UK is still subject to approval by Parliament.


You will not have to pay or prove you have 5 years’ continuous residence.

Settled status if you’re under 21
You will be able to apply for settled or pre-settled status if you’re under 21 and either:
• you’re an EU citizen • your parent, their spouse or their civil partner is an EU citizen
You can apply based on either:
• how long you’ve lived in the UK • the status your parent is eligible for
If you apply based on your how long you’ve lived in the UK
You will need to provide proof you have 5 years’ continuous residence in the UK to be eligible for settled status.
If you have not lived in the UK for a continuous 5-year period you may be eligible for pre-settled status.
Your application will be treated as separate from any family member who also applies to the scheme.
If you apply based on the status your parent is eligible for
You will need to provide proof of your relationship to your parent when you apply.
You will not need to provide proof of residence with your application. However the Home Office may ask you for proof of residence before they make a decision on your application.
If your application is successful you’ll get the same status as your parent.
If your parent is an Irish citizen
Your parent will not need to apply for settled status if they’re an Irish citizen. However, if you’re not a British or Irish citizen, you’ll be eligible for either:
• the same status your parent could get, based on how long they’ve lived in the UK • settled status in your own right, if you’ve lived here for more than 5 years

If you stop working or start work in another EU country
You and your family members can get settled status with less than 5 years’ continuous residence in certain situations.
If you have to stop working
If you’re an EU citizen you may be able to get settled status if you have to stop working or being selfemployed because of an accident or illness (known as ‘permanent incapacity’).
You may be able to get settled status if either:
• you have lived continuously in the UK for the 2 years immediately beforehand • the permanent incapacity was the result of an accident at work or an occupational disease that entitles you to a pension from a UK institution
You can also get settled status if you’re married to or in a civil partnership with a British citizen.
If you’re the family member of an EU citizen at the time they stopped working you may also be eligible for settled status.
If you reach State Pension age or retire early
If you’re an EU citizen you may be able to get settled status if you reach State Pension age or retire early.
If you’re the family member of an EU citizen at the time they reach State Pension age or retire early you
may also be eligible for settled status.
If you reach State Pension age
If you’re an EU citizen, you can get settled status if you stopped working when you reached State Pension age and either:
• you worked continuously or were self employed for 1 year beforehand and have lived continuously in the UK for 3 years • your spouse or civil partner is a British citizen
If you retire early
If you’re an EU citizen you can get settled status if you retire early and either:
• you worked continuously (for someone other than yourself) for 1 year beforehand and have lived continuously in the UK for 3 years • your spouse or civil partner is a British citizen
If you start work or self-employment in another EU country
If you’re an EU citizen you can get settled status if you start work or self-employment in another EU country and you both:
• have lived and worked or been self-employed in the UK continuously for 3 years beforehand • usually return to your UK home once a week
If you’re the family member of an EU citizen at the time they start work or self-employment in another EU country you may also be eligible for settled status.

Applying to the EU Settlement Scheme


The scheme will open fully by 30 March 2019. The test phase of the scheme is open now, but you must meet all the requirements to apply.
The deadline for applying will be 30 June 2021, or 31 December 2020 if the UK leaves the EU without a deal.
When you choose to apply may depend on your circumstances.


How you’ll be able to apply


You’ll be able to complete the application form online using any device when the scheme opens fully (for example, an iPhone). You’ll be able to get support over the phone or in person if you need help doing things online.


You’ll only need an Android phone if you want to scan your identity document – you can send your document by post if you do not have access to an Android phone.


What you’ll need


When you apply, you’ll need proof of:


• your identity • your residence in the UK, unless you have a valid permanent residence document, or valid indefinite leave to remain in or enter the UK • your relationship to a family member from the EU living in the UK, if you’re from outside the EU
Proof of identity
You’ll need a valid passport or national identity card. If you’re from outside the EU, you’ll be able to use any of the following:
• valid passport • biometric residence card• biometric residence permit
When you apply, you’ll be able to either:
• scan your identity document using an Android phone • send your document by post
You can use someone else’s Android phone to scan your document. You can also visit one of the organisations offering to scan your document for you . You’ll need to book an appointment and you may have to pay a fee.
You’ll also need to upload a recent digital photo of your face.
Proof of continuous residence
To be eligible for settled status, you’ll usually need to have lived in the UK for at least 6 months in any 12 month period for 5 years in a row. You’ll need to provide proof of this when you apply.
If you’ve not lived here for 5 years in a row you may still be eligible for pre-settled status.


You can give your National Insurance number to allow an automated check of your residence based on tax and certain benefit records.
If this check is successful, you’ll not need to provide any documents as proof of residence. You’ll only need to provide documents if there is not enough data to confirm you’ve been here for 5 years in a row.
The Home Office will tell you immediately after you apply if you need to provide any documents. You’ll be able to submit photos or scans of your documents through the online application form.


Read what documents you can provide to the Home Office if you’re asked to provide more evidence.


If you have criminal convictions


If you’re 18 or over, the Home Office will check you have not committed serious or repeated crimes, and that you don’t pose a security threat.
You’ll be asked about your criminal history in the UK and overseas. You’ll also be checked against the UK’s crime databases.


If you’ve only been convicted of a minor crime, for example you’ve had a speeding fine, you’ll still be eligible for settled or pre-settled status.
You may still get settled or pre-settled status even if you have other convictions. This will be judged on a case-by-case basis.


If you’ve been to prison, you’ll usually need at least 5 years’ continuous residence from the day you were released to be considered for settled status.


If you’re from outside the EU


You’ll need to provide proof of your relationship to your EU citizen family member (for example, a birth, marriage or civil partnership certificate). You can scan and submit this through the online application form.


You will only need to provide evidence of your family member’s identity and residence if you apply before they do. If your family member applies first you’ll be able to ‘link’ your application to theirs, using the application number your family member gets when they apply.
If you have a valid permanent residence document you do not need to provide this proof of relationship or evidence of your family member’s identity and residence.


You’ll need to provide your fingerprints and a photo of your face at an application centre in the UK. You will not need to do this if you already have a biometric residence card, or are 4 years old or younger.


Fees
You’ll usually have to pay:
• £65 if you’re 16 or over • £32.50 if you’re under 16
There are some situations where you will not need to pay the fee
Apply to the test phase of the scheme
You’ll need to meet additional requirements to be eligible to apply in the test phase – for example, you must also have access to an Android phone.
Find out what other requirements you need to meet, and how to apply.
Get help


You can get help with your application on the phone or online.
If you’re inside the UK Telephone: 0300 123 7379 Monday to Friday (excluding bank holidays), 8am to 8pm Saturday and Sunday, 9:30am to 4:30pm Find out about call charges


If you’re outside the UK Telephone: +44 (0)203 080 0010 Monday to Friday (excluding bank holidays), 8am to 8pm Saturday and Sunday, 9:30am to 4:30pm


Use the EU Settlement Scheme contact form

After you’ve applied


If your application is successful, you’ll be given either settled or pre-settled status. Find out what rights you get for each status.
You’ll get proof of your status through an online service. You will not get a physical document unless both of the following apply:
• you’re from outside the EU • you do not already have a biometric residence card
You can read more information about how to view and prove your status .
If you make a mistake in your application
The Home Office will contact you before making a decision on your application, so you can correct the error.
They’ll also tell you if you need to provide more evidence before they can make a decision.
If your application is unsuccessful
You may be to apply for an administrative review of the decision.
You may be able to appeal the decision if you apply after 29 March 2019. This is still subject to approval by Parliament.
You can also reapply as many times as you want to before 30 June 2021. You’ll have to pay the fee each time you apply.
If you already have an outstanding immigration application
When you apply under the EU Settlement Scheme any other immigration application you have with the Home Office will not be considered.
You’ll get a refund for your outstanding application.
If you withdraw your application
You will not usually get a refund.

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